Lesson Links

Dinosaur Detectives
Link to lesson
This lesson for grades 6-8 explores how paleontologists work together to add to our knowledge of dinosaurs and to our understanding of life during past geological periods. Computer access is optional, but helpful.

Build Your Own Comet
Link to lesson
This activity involves the creation of a “comet” using dry ice, ammonia and several other ingredients. The recipe is provided at the lesson site. This activity can be used at any level by deciding what you want your students to know about comets, such as chemical composition, etc. Appropriate for all ages.

Lessons for Hope
Link to lesson
This Web site from Jane Goodall encourages students to create and use their own real world solutions to problems in their communities and environment.

Extinction: Is It Inevitable?
Link to lesson
This lesson uses an article about extinction to explore the geologic nature of extinction and possible causes of extinction. The effects of humans on animal populations and ecosystems are analyzed. Extensions include suggesting solutions to biodiversity loss and ways to live with sustainable development.

Keystone Species
Link to lesson
This site from the Toronto Zoo’s Wetland Curriculum Resource describes how in North America the beaver is a keystone species. It offers information on the beaver and provides activities to illustrate its importance in the ecosystem.

Finding Magnetic Fields of Earth
Link to lesson
This activity allows students to investigate changes in the Earth’s magnetic field. They can ask questions about past magnetic variations and see what may be in store for us in the future.

Model Volcanoes
Link to lesson
This is a lesson plan from learnnc.com. It provides multiple sets of directions to make model volcanoes. Students will make their models of different types of volcanoes, such as shield and stratovolcanoes, and cause them to erupt to see the effects a volcanic eruption can have on the Earth’s surface. More technologically advanced models can be found on the links on this Web site. Good demonstrations on the spew of ash that enters the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption are included.